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Toucan

Most Recent Blog Post Here: "Meet the Toucan!"

Toucans range in size from the lettered aracari (Pteroglossus inscriptus), at 130 g (4.6 oz) and 29 cm (11.5 inches), to the toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), at 680 g (1.5 lb) and 63 cm (29 inches). Their bodies are short (of comparable size to a crow's) and compact. The tail is rounded and varies in length, from half the length to the whole length of the body. The neck is short and thick. The wings are small, as they are forest-dwelling birds who only need to travel short distances, and are often of about the same span as the bill-tip-to-tail-tip measurements of the bird.

The legs of the toucan are strong and rather short. Their toes are arranged in pairs with the first and fourth toes turned backward. The majority of toucans do not show any sexual dimorphism in their coloration, the genus Selenidera being the most notable exception to this rule (hence their common name, "dichromatic toucanets"). However, the bills of female toucans are usually shorter, deeper and sometimes straighter, giving more of a "blocky" impression compared to male bills. The feathers in the genus containing the largest toucans are generally black, with touches of white, yellow, and scarlet. The underparts of the ara├žaris (smaller toucans) are yellow, crossed by one or more black or red bands. The toucanets have mostly green plumage with... see full article -->



Week 1 Blog Post Here: You Don't Know Git!

Testing 1: Members of the family Picidae have strong bills for drilling and drumming on trees and long sticky tongues for extracting food.[2] Woodpecker bills are typically longer, sharper and stronger than the bills of piculets and wrynecks; however, their morphology is very similar. The bill's chisel-like tip is kept sharp by the pecking action in birds that regularly use it on wood. see full article -->


Week 3 Blog Post Here: CSS Concepts

Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sighted New Zealand in 1642 and called it Staten Landt, supposing it was connected to a landmass of the same name at the southern tip of South America.[11] In 1645 Dutch cartographers renamed the land Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland.[12][13] British explorer James Cook subsequently anglicised the name to New Zealand. see full article -->


Week 4 Blog Post Here: Arrays & Hashes

Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sighted New Zealand in 1642 and called it Staten Landt, supposing it was connected to a landmass of the same name at the southern tip of South America.[11] In 1645 Dutch cartographers renamed the land Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland.[12][13] British explorer James Cook subsequently anglicised the name to New Zealand. see full article -->


Week 5 Blog Post Here: Enumerable Methods

Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sighted New Zealand in 1642 and called it Staten Landt, supposing it was connected to a landmass of the same name at the southern tip of South America.[11] In 1645 Dutch cartographers renamed the land Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland.[12][13] British explorer James Cook subsequently anglicised the name to New Zealand. see full article -->


Week 6 Blog Post Here: Ruby Classes

Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sighted New Zealand in 1642 and called it Staten Landt, supposing it was connected to a landmass of the same name at the southern tip of South America.[11] In 1645 Dutch cartographers renamed the land Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland.[12][13] British explorer James Cook subsequently anglicised the name to New Zealand. see full article -->


Week 7 Blog post: Looping in Ruby vs. Looping in JavaScript

Loops are a common part of most programming language. This is because one of the obvious advantages of using computers is the speed with which they can perform calculations and processes. Using a loop allows a programmer to perform many such processes very quickly, but without having to write code for each one. The programming language can tell the computer what calculations it wants to do and then tell it to repeat this process for other numbers, variables, or any data that you might want to manipulate. see full article -->


Week 8 Blog Post Here: The Power of the Regex

A regular expression is a block of code, or expression the performs a search for a particular piece or pieces of data in a page or text. Regular Expressions are often referred to by the truncated name "regex" or "regexp" or "regexes"(plural)."he concept arose in the 1950s, when the American mathematician Stephen Kleene formalized the description of a regular language, and came into common use with the Unix text processing utilities ed, an editor, and grep (global regular expression print), a filter." ~Wikipedia~


My Projects Page

Here are some projects I'm currently working on including a text-based mini-game. see full article -->


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